History lesson for John McCain

From McCain’s speech this evening at the Republican convention, 8/29/12:

I trust him to know that an American president always, always, always stands up for the rights, and freedoms, and justice of all people.

From “The end of active hostilities,” section of “Gulf War,” Wikipedia

In Iraqi territory that was occupied by the coalition, a peace conference was held where a ceasefire agreement was negotiated and signed by both sides. At the conference, Iraq was approved to fly armed helicopters on their side of the temporary border, ostensibly for government transit due to the damage done to civilian infrastructure. Soon after, these helicopters and much of the Iraqi armed forces were used to fight a Shi’ite uprising in the south. The rebellions were encouraged by an airing of “The Voice of Free Iraq” on 2 February 1991, which was broadcast from a CIA run radio station out of Saudi Arabia. The Arabic service of the Voice of America supported the uprising by stating that the rebellion was large, and that they soon would be liberated from Saddam.

In the North, Kurdish leaders took American statements that they would support an uprising to heart, and began fighting, hoping to trigger a coup d’état. However, when no American support came, Iraqi generals remained loyal to Saddam and brutally crushed the Kurdish uprising. Millions of Kurds fled across the mountains to Kurdish areas of Turkey and Iran….

For more on president George H. W. Bush’s policy of letting Saddam Hussein suppress the US-encouraged post-war revolution, see “1991 uprisings in Iraq,” Wikipedia.

And then, there’s the 1956 Hungarian Revolution, crushed by the Soviet military without president Eisenhower offering any US support for those trying to free themselves from the US’s Cold War enemy.

I’m not saying the US should intervene in more foreign countries, only that I’d think a speaker with millions of people listening to him would want to get his facts straight.

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About politicswestchesterview

Nathaniel regards himself as a progressive Democrat who sees a serious need to involve more Americans in the political process if we are to rise to Ben Franklin's challenge "A republic, madam, if you can keep it," after a passerby asked him what form of government the founders had chosen. This blog gives my views and background information on the local, state, and national political scenes. My career in higher education was mainly in the areas of international studies, foreign languages, and student advising, most recently at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, from which I retired in 2006. I have lived in West Chester since 1986.
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One Response to History lesson for John McCain

  1. Pingback: Those medieval Republicans | politicswestchesterview

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